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Moses from Uganda, Agricultural Development

Testimonial_Moses

Subject: Agricultural Development, 2-year master programme.
Age: 29
Country: Uganda
Scholarship: None. But some funding from Danida and KVL for the fieldwork for his final thesis for the last six months of his study.

Why did you choose to study in Denmark?

I was studying for my Bachelor's degree at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in Uganda, when I heard about the Master programme in Agricultural Development at the Faculty of Life Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. The course description was very interesting and matched my interests very well. I was particularly attracted to the international profile and the opportunity to undertake fieldwork – so I decided to apply and was accepted.

What do you like the most about Denmark?

It is a beautiful country – maybe mostly in the summer when it is not snowing. There aren't so many problems and there doesn't seem to be any threats. It feels like a safe place. And there are good facilities - it is for instance easy to travel around.

What do you like the most about studying in Denmark - socially?

I like that we are working in teams. This means that you get to know your fellow students very well. I have many good colleagues that I think I will stay in touch with in the future. I also like the close relationship between teachers and students. We call them by their first name and we work side by side with them – also when doing fieldwork. In Uganda, the teachers must be addressed by their title and surname and they aren't as approachable as here.

What do you like the most about studying in Denmark - academically?

I like the way the study programme is put together. It addresses problems in the developing countries. It has a very international profile and is well suited for an international carreer. The student population is mixed – half is Danish and the other international. The programme includes a lot of fieldwork and has a practical approach. In Uganda, development studies are very theoretical. Here, we have the possibility to do fieldwork. For instance, all the students have just been on study tours to Thailand, Malaysia and Swaziland. I was on the tour to Thailand, which was great.

What surprised you most about Denmark?

The language and the culture surprised me. I knew it was very different, but it was a bit of a shock that people were so closed. It takes a while to get to know people. Where I come from people are much more open, e.g. they talk on the busses and you can get to know people on a bus ride.

What don't you like about studying in Denmark?

I don't really have any complaints, but there were a few courses that were described in English, which I thought I could take, but in reality they were taught in Danish. However, it hasn't been difficult to find courses taught in English and all the courses that I follow are really interesting.

Where do you live?

At a kollegium in Hvidovre, which is very nice.

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