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If you are thinking about studying in Denmark, you will have some basic questions. Find your answers here

Study Options

Danish higher education institutions offer a range of opportunities for international students. More than 700 programmes are taught in English - all internationally recognised and of high quality

students in lecture hall

Whether you are interested in a research-oriented programme or an applied programme you will have plenty of options in Denmark. You can choose between several programmes taught entirely in English:

You can choose between three types of Danish educational institutions:

Thanks to credit transfer opportunities, you will sometimes be able to move between institutions.

STUDY PROGRAMMEINSTITUTIONS

2-2 1/2 YEAR ACADEMY PROFESSION (AP) PROGRAMMES
The Academy Profession programmes combine theory with practice and are suited for employment in business and industry. The programmes are available in a range of disciplines, including business, technology, IT, multimedia, food industry, tourism, etc.

DANISH BUSINESS
ACADEMIES

UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

Main characteristics (AP)

  • 2 years (120 ECTS credits)
  • Applied learning and professional skills
  • Collaboration with business and industry
  • Work placements
1/2-4 1/2 YEAR PROFESSIONAL BACHELOR'S PROGRAMMES
The Professional Bachelor’s programmes combine theoretical study with practical application in a range of subject areas such as business, education, engineering, IT, nursing, social work, etc. Work placements are always included in the programmes, which prepare students to enter specific professions.

DANISH BUSINESS ACADEMIES

UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

Main characteristics (Prof. BA)

  • 3 to 4½ years (180-270 ECTS credits)
  • Oriented towards specific professions
  • Theory and practice in one programme
3-YEAR BACHELOR'S PROGRAMMES
The university Bachelor’s programme is research-based and provides students with a broad academic foundation as well as specialised knowledge. The programmes qualify students to enter the labour market and to pursue post-graduate studies.

UNIVERSITIES

ARTISTIC HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Main characteristics (BA)

  • 3 years (180 ECTS credits)
  • Research-based education
  • Predominantly theoretical
  • Preparation for postgraduate study
2-YEAR CANDIDATUS/MASTER'S PROGRAMMES
The Candidatus/Master’s programme is research-based and gives students a theoretical knowledge combined with the ability to apply this practically. Upon completion of the pro­gramme, students can enter the labour market or undertake further studies (PhD).

UNIVERSITIES

ARTISTIC HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Main characteristics (MA)

  • 2 years (120 ECTS credits)
  • Research-based
  • Career oriented
3-YEAR PHD PROGRAMMES
The PhD programme is research-based and contains independent research, teaching, par­ticipation in research networks and often placements at other, primarily foreign, research institutions. The PhD programme holds various opportunities for financial support.
Please note the possibility for more flexible PhD programmes at individual Universities. Read more about this below

UNIVERSITIES

ARTISTIC HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Main characteristics (PHD)

  • 3 years (180 ECTS credits)
  • Research
  • Teaching required
  • Opportunities for financial support

Degree programmes

International students can choose from more than 700 degree programmes.

Undergraduate study

Before choosing your programme, you first need to decide on the purpose of your studies. What is your ultimate goal? Do you want a professional qualification that will lead to a specific career? Then you might wish to consider one of the Academy Profession or Professional Bachelor’s programmes. These tend to be fairly structured, with periods of compulsory work placement. However, if you are focused on academic achievement, you may prefer a more research-based university Bachelor’s degree. They offer more time for independent study, group activities and project work.

Academy Profession degree

An Academy Profession (AP) degree programme is for you if you seek employment in business and industry. Combining theory and practice, AP degree programmes are developed in close collaboration with representatives from their respective professional sector. This ensures that the skills you’ll acquire will be as current and advanced as possible.

You will learn to identify, select and analyse data and information from a variety of sources. In addition to attending lectures, AP students often undertake project work in small or larger groups. You will also complete work placements in Danish or overseas companies – giving you the chance to apply your skills and knowledge in practice.

 


Video: Mary from the Philippines studies Internet Technology, which is a 2-year Academy Profession degree at Copenhagen Business Academy. Watch more videos

An AP programme normally lasts two years, with each year divided into two semesters. They are offered at Danish Business Academies (‘Erhvervsakademier’). These can be found all over Denmark.

Facilitating close contact between students and local companies, Danish Business Academies offer a niche set of programmes and tend to be smaller than universities. Some examples of AP programmes taught in English are: communications, computer science, design and technology, hospitality and tourism management, marketing management and multimedia design.

Top-up Degrees
In some programmes students have the possiblity to continue their AP Degree at a bachelor level by way of a top-up degree. The top-up degree is approximately 1½ years of study (90 ECTS) and is usually within a prespecified field or one related to the AP degree they have acquired. At the end of the top-up degree the student will have achieved a Professional Bachelor Degree (see below)

Bachelor’s degrees

There are two kinds of Bachelor’s degrees offered by Danish higher education institutions: a Professional Bachelor’s degree and a University Bachelor’s degree.

A Professional Bachelor’s degree qualifies you to enter a specific profession. It is awarded after three to four and a half years of study (se Top-up Degrees above). In addition to attending lectures, students participate in seminars, project work and group activities. The theoretical foundation is also applied practically through work placements.

To complete the programme successfully, students must submit a final project. Professional Bachelor’s degrees are offered at university colleges (‘Professionshøjskoler’). These institutions have strong links to businesses and universities, as well as other research institutes within their region.


Video: Judith from Uganda studies Public Health & Nutrition, a Professional Bachelor’s degree at Metropol University College. Watch more videos

With a great selection of subject areas to choose from, including engineering, IT management, nursing, health and nutrition, teacher training, journalism and social education, university colleges offer you a unique opportunity to undertake a career-oriented education programme. Most programmes give access to further study at the postgraduate level.

The University Bachelor’s degree is awarded after the completion of a three-year undergraduate programme, normally undertaken within one or two subject areas. Teaching is research-based. It provides students with a broad academic foundation, as well as specialised knowledge. Towards the end of the programme you are required to submit a final project. The programme qualifies you to either enter the labour market or to pursue postgraduate studies.


Video: Johann from Germany studies Intercultural Business Communication, a Bachelor´s degree at Copenhagen Business School. Watch more videos

Postgraduate study

Candidatus/Master’s degree
A Candidatus/Master’s degree is an advanced, research-based course that takes two years. It will give you exceptional theoretical knowledge, combined with the ability to apply it practically. It includes a final dissertation (normally 30-60 ECTS credits) or, in certain subjects, a more practical project. A broad range of interdisciplinary programmes have been developed to meet the needs of a globalised, knowledge-based society. Upon completion of the programme, you will be able to enter the labour market or undertake further studies (e.g. a PhD).


Video: Dario is doing his PhD in Sustainable Energy at The Technical University of Denmark, which is is also offered as a MSc programme. Watch more videos

PhD studies

A Danish PhD degree usually takes three years to achieve. They are offered at research institutions and universities that have established a PhD school. These educational establishments all offer excellent research, library and laboratory facilities. You will be able to conduct in-depth research under expert supervision and with access to the latest equipment and information.

Teaching and completion of a dissertation are both integral to the programme. PhD students are often encouraged to participate in research networks, including placements at overseas research institutions. A range of funding opportunities are available, please visit the Researchers Mobility Portal for more information.

By way of the Ministerial Order on the PhD Programme at the Universities and Certain Higher Artistic Educational Institutions (PhD Order) it is possible for Universities to commence the PhD Programme  in connection with a Master's programme. Each individual universities lays down its own rules regarding this type of hybrid PhD. An example of this is Aarhus University’s 4- and 5-year PhD scholarships

Exchange programmes

If you want to study in Denmark as an exchange student, you must already be enrolled at a higher education institution. Usually, such students come to Denmark through an agreement like Erasmus or a governmental bilateral agreement. We advise you to contact your own educational establishment first to find out more. However, if you don’t find any helpful information there, please contact the international office of the Danish institution where you wish to study.

Short-term programmes and summer schools

International students have many options in terms of short-term study programmes or summer schools in English. Both give you the opportunity to increase your skills and knowledge, within and outside your field of study. They also provide a unique chance to work with Danish and other international students. If you are considering studying in Denmark, a summer school is a great introduction. They typically last between four to six weeks.

Useful links
The Researchers Mobility Portal
http://ec.europa.eu/euraxess/

Admission Requirements

In Denmark, each institution is responsible for its own admissions. Requirements vary from programme to programme. Here is what you need to know about how and when to apply

Assessment of your qualifications

STDK. Latina Pige

Non-Danish citizens who do not have a Danish entrance examination are eligible for admission if they have qualifications recognised as being comparable to Danish entrance qualifications.

For an official pre-assessment of your qualifications visit ufm.dk/en/recognition. The assessment briefly states what your qualifications correspond to in Denmark and will improve your application. The assessment serves only as a guideline since the individual institution in Denmark is responsible for its own admissions.

The institution in Denmark will require certified copies of your educational qualifications. That is, you must provide copies with original stamps and signatures, or have two people who are not related to you sign the back of the copy with their name, address and birth date. Some institutions require that they receive the documents directly from the issuing institution. This can often take several months, so be sure to arrange in time.

Further information about entrance qualifications, additional tests and potential credit transfers can be obtained from the institutions' admissions offices.

See a list of higher education institutions in Denmark.

General admission requirements

English language requirements

All higher education programmes in Denmark require a high standard of English. Applicants to English-taught undergraduate and postgraduate programmes must, as a minimum, prove English proficiency comparable to 'English B' in the Danish upper secondary school (gymnasium). Some programmes require 'English A', which is one level higher than 'English B'.

To prove a satisfactory proficiency in English, the language tests TOEFL, IELTS and Cambridge ESOL examinations (CAE) are often used. The score equivalents are determined by the individual institution, so to be certain check out their language requirements. Based upon a rough average of previous reqirements, here is an estimate of the ranges you can expect:

IELTSTOEFLCambridge Advanced English
* English B - test score of at least 6.5 points * English B - test scores in the ranges of 550-583 (paper-based), or 213-237 (computer-based test), or 79-93 (internet-based test) * English B - Certificate in Advanced English (CAE)
English A - test score of at least 7.0 points English A - test scores in the ranges of 587-610 (paper-based), or 240-253 (computer-based test), or 94-101 (internet-based test) English A – Certificate of Proficiency (CPE)

Note: * Some programmes require 'English A', which is one level higher than 'English B'.

Applicants who are native English speakers are exempted from these test requirements. Also, applicants who can document English proficiency at an equivalent level may contact the institution's International Admission Office to determine if their English level is sufficient.

Requirements for admission into Danish-taught study programmes

If you are able to study in Danish you can find courses and degree programmes taught in Danish at www.ug.dk. For admission into these programmes you must prove a satisfactory level of proficiency in Danish by taking the test called ‘Danish as a Foreign Language’ (‘Studieprøven i dansk som andetsprog’) or ‘Danish Test 2’ (‘Danskprøve 2’). Some programmes may require that you have passed ‘Danish Test 3’ (‘Danskprøve 3’). Read more at ufm.dk

Note that as an international student you can take Danish lessons for free. In this way you may enroll first in an English-taught undergraduate programme and then continue your education in Danish at the graduate level once you have achieved the required Danish language skills.

Requirements for undergraduate studies

Admission requirements for Bachelor programmes are:

Certain study programmes have additional admission requirements. This could include:

  • Subjects passed on a certain level. Danish education use levels A, B and C,  A being the highest.
  • Subjects passed with a certain minimum grade
  • The diploma in total passed with a certain minimum GPA
  • Passed admission test/interview

For more information on foreign qualifications and entry to Danish higher education, visit ufm.dk

Requirements for postgraduate studies

Admission requirements for Candidatus/Master programmes are:

  • an internationally recognised Bachelor's degree of good standard or equivalent
  • proof of proficiency in English (see above)
  • proof of proficiency in Danish, if the programme is taught in Danish (se above)

Requirements for PhD studies

To embark on a PhD, you generally need to have a Master's/Candidatus degree or equivalent.  In some areas, a four-year PhD programme is offered to students who have completed a Bachelor’s qualification and one year of study at postgraduate level. See also current PhD positions

How and when to apply

Undergraduates

For undergraduate studies, the admission deadline is 15 March for courses starting in August or September. A few institutions have additional intakes in January or February. For those courses, the deadline is 1 September. The application forms are available from the institutions approximately two months prior to the deadline. Online application forms can also be found at www.optagelse.dk (read the guide carefully).

Postgraduates

For postgraduate studies, deadlines vary. We recommend that you contact the institution directly for details.

Useful links

Guide to recognition of foreign qualifications
http://ufm.dk/en/recognition

Foreign qualifications for entry into Danish higher education (list)
http://ufm.dk/en/education-and-institutions/recognition-and-transparency/find-assessments/entry-to-higher-education

Online application forms - undergraduate studies only (read the guide carefully)
https://www.optagelse.dk/admission/index.html?cpr=yesno

Tuition Fees & Scholarships

Higher education in Denmark is free for students from the EU/EEA and Switzerland and for students participating in an exchange programme. For other students annual tuition range from 6,000 to 16,000 Euro. A number of scholarships and grants are available from the institutions and from public funded schemes

Tuition fees

Higher education in Denmark is free for students from the EU/EEA and Switzerland. Similarly, if you are participating in an exchange programme your studies in Denmark are free. You also do not pay for tuition if you at the time of application have a:

All other students must pay tuition fees.

Annual tuition fees for full-degree students
USD 8,000-21,000 / Euro 6,000-16,000 (DKK 45,000-120,000).
Note: for exact fees you should contact the institution in question.

Application fee

Students from outside EU/EEA/Switzerland will be charged a fee when applying for a residence permit (visa) to study in Denmark.

STDK. Danish student smiling1

Read more about residence permit application procedures for non-EU/EEA students

Scholarships and grants

Most Danish institutions have bilateral agreements with foreign institutions of higher education. These agreements are usually designed for mutual exchange of students, researchers and teachers. National and European programmes offer scholarships for international students wishing to study in Denmark through an institutional agreement, as guest students or as a part of an international double or joint degree. Certain restrictions and prerequisites apply for the following programmes:

Danish Innovation Scholarship

The Innovation Fund Denmark are providing 3.4 million euros in scholarships throughout the years 2015 and 2016. The grant is reserved for dedicated, top-tier students with an academic profile within the areas of natural, environmental and health sciences, engineering, technology and innovation.
Read more about the Danish Innovation Scholarship

Nordplus

STDK. Danish student Royal Library

If you are enrolled at a Nordic or Baltic higher education institution, Nordplus may offer a possibility to study in another Nordic or Baltic country as part of your degree. For further information, contact your home university or the national educational agency. To learn more about the Nordplus programme, please visit www.nordplusonline.org.

Erasmus

The Erasmus programme offers students from the EU/EEA and Switzerland the possibility to study abroad as part of their higher education in their home countries. Exchanges last between 3 and 12 months. For further information, please contact your home university or the national educational agency of your country. To learn more about the Erasmus-programme and find out if you are eligible to apply, please visit the website of the European Commission.

Erasmus Mundus/Joint Master Degree

The Erasmus Mundus programme is open to both EU/EEA and non-EU/EAA students. Through the Erasmus Mundus scheme you can apply for a scholarship to undertake specific Master's degree programmes. The courses are offered jointly by a Danish institution and another European university or college. Students and scholars must contact the individual Erasmus Mundus Master courses to learn more about scholarships and application procedures.

See a list of approved Erasmus Mundus Masters courses in Denmark

Fulbright Commission

American students in higher education wishing to study in Denmark may be able to apply for a Fulbright scholarship. Further information is available at the Denmark-American Foundation and the Fulbright Commission website.

The Danish Government Scholarships under the Cultural Agreements

STDK. ITU Building

The Danish Government Scholarships under the Cultural Agreements are aimed at highly qualified exchange students and young researchers who wish to immerse themselves in studies of the Danish language and culture or other fields of study related to Denmark, such as design, architecture, environmental studies, and other related fields.

The Cultural Agreements offer scholarships for long-term study periods and summer languages courses to foreign students. Long-term scholarships are offered to students from China, Egypt, Israel, Japan, Russia and South Korea, while the summer language courses are open to students from the aforementioned countries and 34 European countries. The annual deadline to apply for scholarships for the following academic year is March 1st.  Read more about the Danish Government Scholarships under the Cultural Agreements

Danish government scholarships for highly qualified non-EU/EEA students

Danish higher education institutions receive a limited number of government scholarships each year to fund highly qualified full-degree students from non-EU/EEA countries and Switzerland.

In order to be eligible for a scholarship you must be:

  • A citizen of a country outside the EU, the European Economic Area or Switzerland
  • Enrolled in a full degree higher education programme
  • Granted a time-limited residence permit in Denmark due to education

You are not eligible for a Danish government scholarship if you are:

  • Seeking admission to an Artistic Higher Education Institution
  • Have a legal claim to the rights of Danish citizens
  • Have been granted a residence permit at the time of admission by the Danish Aliens Consolidations Act §9c, subsection 1, as the child of a foreign citizen who has been granted a residence permit in accordance with the Danish Aliens Consolidations Act §9m, and who is a citizen of a country that is not acceded to the EU or covered by the EEA agreement
  • A student who is eligible for a grant in accordance with Danish Law regarding the State Education Fund

The scholarships are administered by the Danish institutions of higher education, each of which decides which students will receive a scholarship. For further information about the government scholarship, please consult the admission details of the higher education institution of your choice.

Please note: The government scholarship consists of two parts and can be given as full or partial tuition fee waivers and/or grants towards covering your living costs. However, since the scholarships are administered by the individual higher education institution you should enquire at the institution of your choice for further details.

The Danish State Educational Support (SU)

The Danish State Educational Support (SU) is generally only awarded to Danish residents. As an international student you may, however, apply for equal status in so far as the state educational support is concerned. You may be granted equal status according to:

For details on how to apply, visit the website of the Danish Education Support Agency.

Other sources of information on scholarships

Several scholarship programmes for both EU and non-EU students are listed at the EU-database Ploteus. PhD students and researchers should visit the European Researchers' Mobility Portal.

Useful links

The Teaching Style in Denmark

Information about the Danish Education System and the Grading System in Denmark

Teaching style - characteristics:

  • Student-centered learning and and open debate during class
  • Close collaboration between students and teachers
  • Traditonal lectures combined with project work with the teacher as a consultant
  • Active participation and problem solving rather than passive listening
  • Focus on turning new knowledge and learning into innovative solutions

You gain:

  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • The ability to work analytically and creatively in a problem-solving environment
  • The ability to work independently as well as effectively as a team member
  • An internationally recognised qualification
  • An international profile - and an excellent foundation for your future career


VIDEO: What it's like to study abroad in Denmark? We asked 19 international students.
Watch more student testimonials

THINK-PLAY-PARTICIPATE

Students in Denmark are expected to play an active role in their own learning process. Apart from attending traditional lectures, students engage in  project work and are encouraged to participate in open discussions with their teachers and fellow students.

Project work & problem based learning

As a student in Denmark you will attend lectures, study independently and undertake projects – on your own and in groups of students. These projects will challenge you to think  freely, to use your initiative and be creative. They will also give you experience in using new knowledge to solve complex real-world problems.

students around table

In addition to project work, Danish professors often have experience as working professionals, offering students an invaluable practical perspective. Moreover, many Danish educational institutions are partnered with local companies and public organisations for research purposes, and many programmes offer students internships and thus work experience.

What a typical week look like

A typical week of classes will consist of 10 hours of tuition and around 30 hours of preparation, self-study and project work. This, however, varies depending on the type of higher education institution.

The on-going evaluation of your progress will take place through oral and written exams.

The Danish education system

The Danish education system offers high quality education and training at all levels

Groupwork

Here is an an overview of the levels of education in Denmark:

  • Pre-school
  • Primary and lower secondary education
  • Upper secondary education
  • Vocational education and training
  • Higher education
  • Adult learning

Before starting pre-school most children in Denmark benefit from day-care services such as nurseries and kindergarten. Pre-school, which is optional, is followed by nine years of compulsory education in primary and lower secondary school. There is an optional tenth form. The upper secondary education system includes a range of opportunities. Academic programmes allow students to apply for entry to higher education. Vocational programmes are aimed at direct entry to the labour market.

The higher education sector includes:

  • Artistic Higher Education Institutions (research and/or artistically based undergraduate and postgraduate programmes)
  • Universities (research-based undergraduate and postgraduate programmes)
  • University Colleges (Academy Profession and professional Bachelor's programmes)
  • Business Academies (short-cycle higher education institutions offering Academy Profession and joint Bachelor's degree programmes)
  • Adult education. The opportunities for lifelong learning in terms of adult education are many. They are offered at all levels. Individual courses are also offered under the Act on Open Education, either at college or university

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

ACADEMY PROFESSION DEGREE
- 2 years (120 ECTS)
- Degree from an Academy of Professional Higher Education or a University College
- Theory and practice in one programme
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Developed in close collaboration with business and industry
- Small class sizes and close contact between students and teachers

PROFESSIONAL BACHELOR'S DEGREE
- 3-4 years (180-240 ECTS)
- Degree from a University College
- Aimed at specific professions
- Theory and practice in one programme
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Small class sizes and close contact between students and teachers

TOP-UP DEGREE
- 1½ year (90 ECTS)
- Degree from a University College or a Business Academy
- For students who have already completed an AP degree programme
- Theory and practice in one programme
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Small class sizes and close contact between students and teachers

BUSINESS ACADEMY BACHELOR'S DEGREE
- 3½ year (220 ECTS)
- Degree from a Business Academy
- Aimed at specific professions
- Theory and practice in one programme
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Small class sizes and close contact between students and teachers

UNIVERSITY BACHELOR'S DEGREE
- 3 years (180 ECTS)
- Research-based education
- Degree from a University
- Predominantly theoretical
- Opportunities to undertake study periods or internships abroad
- Independent studies as well as project work

ARTISTIC BACHELOR'S DEGREE
- 3 years (180 ECTS)
- Degree from an Artistic Higher Education Institution
- Research and/or artistically based education
- Theory and artistic practice in one programme
- Opportunities to undertake study periods or internships abroad
- Independent studies as well as project work

POSTGRADUATE DEGREES

MASTER'S DEGREE                                                                                                   
- 2 years (120 ECTS)
- Degree from a University
- Research-based education
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Exchange opportunities at universities around the world
- Access to PhD studies or the labour market

ARTISTIC MASTER'S DEGREE
- 2 years (120 ECTS)
- Degree from an Artistic Higher Education Institution
- Research and/or arstistically based education
- Internships in Denmark or abroad
- Exchange opportunities at selected Universities and Artistic Higher Education Institution around the world
- Access to PhD studies or the labour market

PHD DEGREE
- 3 years (180 ECTS)
- Degree from a University / Research institution or an Artistic Higher Education Institution
- Research and teaching in Denmark
- International Experience and cooperation
- Opportunities for financial support

Science students at computer

Useful links
The Danish Ministry of Children and Education
http://eng.uvm.dk/

The Danish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Higher Education
http://en.ufm.dk/

The Danish grading system

The grading system in Denmark applies to all educational institutions. The seven-point scale allows you to easily convert your Danish grades to ECTS credits according to the EU’s European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System

Below you find a view of the Danish seven-point scale:

STDK.7-point scale

STDK.Stolerækker

In some cases, a simple pass or fail can be given instead of grades. Your performance will be assessed according to academic targets set for the specific subject or course.  For further information about grading, please visit the Ministry of Education - Order on the Grading Scale and Other Forms of Assessment (primary and secondary school, short to medium-cycle higher education) and Ministry of Science - Order on the Grading Scale and Other Forms of Assessment (university education).

Useful links
Ministry of Education - Order on the Grading Scale and Other Forms of Assessment (PDF)
http://ufm.dk/en/education-and-institutions/the-danish-education-system/grading-system/ministry_of_education_order_262_2007_grading_scale.pdf

Ministry of Science - Order on the Grading Scale and Other Forms of Assessment (PDF)
http://ufm.dk/en/education-and-institutions/the-danish-education-system/grading-system/karakterbekendtgoerelse_vtu_en.pdf

Accreditation & Quality Assurance

Higher education in Denmark is regulated by the state. An ongoing evaluation process ensures that all programmes are of high international quality and relevance

Students on bridge

Higher education in Denmark is regulated by the state. Danish educational institutions enjoy a high degree of autonomy but are required to follow national regulations in terms of teacher qualifications, degree structures and examination processes.

This ensures that all students in Denmark obtain an education of high international quality and relevance. Furthermore, many institutions have obtained international accreditation for their programmes.

All institutions of higher education in Denmark use the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS), which facilitates international credit transfer. You will receive certificates or other types of official documentation for all completed courses. If you complete a full degree or a diploma programme you will receive a Diploma Supplement in English.

Useful links
For further information on ECTS and Diploma Supplements, please visit:
www.studyindenmark.dk/faq

Your guarantee of a quality experience

All higher education institutions in Denmark have agreed to a set of ethical guidelines (Code of Conduct) for the recruitment, admission and education of international students. This is your guarantee that you will receive proper information, guidance and treatment as an international student in Denmark. The Code of Conduct applies to both exchange students and full degree students.

Useful links
The Code of Conduct of all Danish Universities, Univeristy Colleges and Danish Business Academies
http://studyindenmark.dk/why-denmark/we-welcome-your-perspective-1/TheCodeofConductforhighereducationinstitutions.pdf

Health & Safety

With one of the world's lowest crime rates and free healthcare for international students, Denmark is a safe choice for international students. Read on to see how you are covered during your studies in Denmark

STDK. CPH Living, Tuala

Below you can read more about healthcare, safety, emergency services, police, insurance issues and how you get used to a different culture.

Emergency (112) and police (114)

Should you need emergency assistance, dial 112 Should you need general police assistance, dial 114

STDK. Girl Dancing on Chairs

The Danish way of life is based on mutual trust and tolerance. Compared to many other economically advanced countries, crime rates in Denmark are low. But naturally you should be vigilant and take care of your valuables. The Danish police is approachable and helpful, so don't hesitate to contact them for assistance if you are in need. If it not is an emergency, you can reach the police at 114.

Emergency services

In the event of an emergency, call the emergency services at 112 for ambulance, police and fire services. When you dial the emergency call centre you will be asked for your name, address and the phone number from which you are calling. The call centre will then make sure that appropriate help is sent immediately

IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY: DIAL 112

Healthcare

As a student and resident in Denmark you will have access to the Danish healthcare system. Here is what you need to know

Student in grass

The Danish healthcare system offers equal and universal access for all residents. As an international student and resident in Denmark you will have access to free medical treatments with some exceptions, such as dental care and physiotherapy.

Here is what you you need to know.

Coverage without registering with the Danish Civil Registration System


Students from outside the EU/EEA

In accordance with the Danish Health Act, all non-residents staying in Denmark are entitled to emergency hospital care free of charge 'in the event of an accident, childbirth, acute illness or sudden aggravation of a chronic disease'. All other healthcare services must be paid for by you or your insurance

Please note: The Danish public healthcare system does not cover transportation to your home country in the event of illness.

Students from the EU/EEA or Switzerland

If you are an EU/EEA citizen or a Swiss national and you plan to stay in Denmark for less than 3 months, and provided you are covered by a statutory health insurance service in another EU country, you can use your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to access any healthcare service that becomes medically necessary during your stay in Denmark. You will enjoy the same healthcare services offered to residents in Denmark and the charge for these services will be forwarded to the statutory health insurance service that issued the EHIC.

Please note: Students from the Nordic countries need not show any of these documents and students from the UK need only show their UK passport.

Coverage when registering with the Danish Civil Registration System


Students from outside the EU/EEA

If you are a non-EU/EEA citizen and you plan to stay in Denmark for more than 3 months then you must obtain a Danish residence permit and register with the Civil Registration System. Hereafter you are entitled to free medical treatment in Denmark.

Students from the EU/EEA or Switzerland

If you are an EU/EEA citizen or a Swiss national and plan to stay in Denmark for more than 3 months, and provided you are covered by the statutory health insurance service in your home country, you enjoy full access to the Danish national healthcare system once you have registered with the Civil Registration System. To register you must present an E106 form, a S1 Portable Document, or a valid EHIC card issued by your statutory health insurance.

How to register with the Civil Registration System

When registering with the Civil Registration System you must choose whether you want to be insured in Group 1 or Group 2.

Care offered by General practitioners (GPs) and specialists in Group 1 is free of charge - and you will be asked to choose a GP who will refer you to a specialist when necessary. If you choose to be insured in Group 2 you will not be assigned a specific GP but will enjoy access to any GP or specialist on request. However, only a part of the costs for treatment in Group 2 is reimbursed. Roughly 98% of Danish residents are insured in Group 1.

The Danish National Health Insurance Card

Upon registering with the Civil Registration System, you will receive a national health insurance card (‘Sygesikringskort’). The card is your proof that you are entitled to all public healthcare services in Denmark and must be presented at all visits to doctors, hospitals and at pharmacists when collecting prescription drugs.

The card states your name, address and your Civil Personal Registration (CPR) number as well as the name and address of your doctor. It also provides healthcare coverage for up to one month on holiday trips within the EU/EEA and Switzerland.

Useful links

IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY: DIAL 112
If you need non-emergency medical treatment during weekends, public holidays or after 4 pm on weekdays, you must contact the local doctor-on-call service. The number can be found in your local telephone directory or on the website of your local municipality. You can also visit: www.sundhed.dk or www.laegevagten

Insurance

Danish educational institutions cannot be held liable in the event of theft or loss of property. Therefore, be sure to take out adequate insurance while studying in Denmark

STDK. Safe Student

We strongly recommend that you take out adequate insurance while studying in Denmark. The following insurance coverage is recommended:

  • Third-party liability insurance (‘ansvarsforsikring’) – covering expenses if you have to pay compensation to another person
  • Accident insurance (‘ulykkesforsikring’) – covering the financial consequences of an accident
  • Home insurance (‘indboforsikring’) – for your personal belongings
  • Car insurance (‘bilforsikring’) – If you bring a car with you, please make sure it is properly insured. If you decide to take out the insurance in Denmark, try contacting some of the larger insurance companies. Their websites are in English. Your host institution may be able to refer you to specific insurance companies.

Culture shock

Arriving in a new country can shake you up. This is called culture shock and is very common. Here are some tips on easing yourself into a new culture.

STDK. CBS. Studenterpyramide_low

Arriving in a new country can shake you up. You can feel disoriented as you leave a familiar place and arrive somewhere quite different. The reaction may be both physical and psychological. This is called culture shock and is very common. It takes time to adapt to a new culture.

Although Denmark is a well-organised country and people here will be eager to make you feel comfortable, you will need some time to settle in. Like many of your fellow students then at one point in time you may ask yourself why you left home.

When this happens it is important for you to remember that you are going through a learning process. If you accept this brief period while you adapt to a new country and lifestyle as a learning experience you will ultimately return home with greater self-confidence and the ability to succeed in a multicultural environment.

So keep active, explore your social opportunities and try to learn Danish. If you keep an open mind, you will soon be drawn into the many activities on offer. Remember: you are not alone in experiencing these feelings. Talking about your feelings and worries is the best way of dealing with them.

Here are some tips on easing yourself into a new culture:

  • Accept that you cannot know everything about your new country and language
  • Keep an open mind
  • Try to do things that you did at home
  • Stay in touch with family and friends at home
  • Talk to other students about how you feel
  • Stay active

Permits, Visas & Red Tape

We want to make it easy for you to come to Denmark and experience our first-class education. But obviously, there are some official forms to be filled. Hopefully, this shouldn’t prove too complicated

Do I need a visa?

Read here to see if you will need to apply for a visa before coming to Denmark

STDK. Girl with cutton spider

A visa is issued for the purpose of a short stay of no more than 90 days in Denmark. The 90 days must be spent within a 180 day period in either Denmark or another Schengen country.

See which nationals need a visa to enter Denmark

Foreign nationals who are required a visa to enter Denmark and who intend to stay in Denmark for more than 3 months must apply for a residence permit prior to arriving in Denmark. Please note that if you apply for a residence permit and visa at the same time, your visa application will be turned down.

If you have been granted certain types of residence or re-entry permits in another Schengen country, you do not need a visa to enter Denmark. Read more about residence permits issued by another Schengen country. These  types of residence permits are not valid for entry into the Faroe Islands or Greenland.

Please note that employment is not permitted during a stay covered by a visa.

Where to file your application

You may apply for a visa at any authorised Danish mission in a country where you are staying legally on a permanent or temporary basis. This includes all Danish Embassies and certain consulates abroad. Furthermore, visas may be issued by the The Trade Council of Denmark, Taipei in Taiwan.

Certain honorary consulates may receive visa applications and forward them to the supervising Danish Embassy. In such cases, if a visa is granted, you must contact the Embassy in person at a later stage.in order to have your visa issued. If it is more convenient for you, it may also be arranged that the authorisation to issue a visa is sent to another Danish mission on your route to Denmark. See all Danish missions abroad and their visa approval authority.

For certain countries, Denmark has entered into an agreement with another Schengen country about the handling of visa applications on behalf of Denmark. See which other Schengen countries handle visa applications on behalf of Denmark. As a rule these agreements only cover applications for short stay visas.

For further information about the Danish Immigration rules, visit the website of the Danish Immigration Service. You can also contact the nearest Danish embassy or consulate.

Useful links

Registration certificates - for EU/EEA/Swiss citizens

As an EU/EEA citizen or Swiss national you may stay in Denmark for up to three months without a registration certificate. But if you stay longer, you will need one. Here is how to get it

STDK. Girl at computer

As an EU/EEA citizen or Swiss national, you may stay in Denmark for up to three months without a residence permit. If you work while you are here, you can stay up to six months.

If you wish to stay longer, you will need either a registration certificate (for EU/EEA citizens) or a residence card (for Swiss nationals).

Why do I need this?
Unlike a residence permit issued under the Danish Aliens Act, registration certificates/cards are merely proof of your existing rights under EU rules on the free movement of people and services.

How to obtain a registration certificate

The residence permit or card may be obtained from the Regional State Administration (Statsforvaltningen) within three months upon your arrival in Denmark. Bring your passport, two passport photos and your 'Letter of Admission'.

Note that it may take up to three weeks to process your application and issue your permit. You must obtain your residence permit in order to register with the Danish Civil Registration and be covered by Danish Health Insurance

Useful links

Regional State Administration
http://www.statsforvaltning.dk/site.aspx?p=6394

Residence permits - for non-EU/EEA citizens

As a non-EU/EAA citizen you will need to apply for a Danish residence permit to study in Denmark - before coming to Denmark. Here is what you need to know

Creative smiling female student sitting on table

As a non-EU/EAA citizen you may be granted a Danish residence permit in order to study in Denmark.

To be granted a residence permit, you must prove in writing that:

  • You have been accepted as a student to a higher education course/programme at a university, college or institute that has been approved by the Danish government
  • You are either completing an entire educational programme offered by a Danish institution of higher learning or are a visiting/guest student attending part of a programme that you have already commenced in your country of residence
  • You can support yourself financially for the duration of your stay. If you are to pay a tuition fee, you must document that you have paid the tuition fee for the first semester or year, instead of documenting that you can support yourself. (Please note: foreign students do not usually receive state grants or benefits in Denmark. If you make a false claim for such assistance, your residence permit may be revoked and you risk deportation)
  • You can speak and understand the language of instruction and have a functional command of either Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German

How to apply for a student residence permit

To apply for a Danish residence permit, fill out this application form

Be careful when filling out your application. An incorrectly completed form could jeopardise your chances of success. The process is as follows:

  1. First, a representative of the educational institution in Denmark will complete section two of the application form, attach the required documents and send it to you.
  2. Next, complete section one of the application form and attach your own supporting documents.
  3. Submit the application in its entirety at the nearest Danish embassy or general consulate in your home country. It will then be forwarded to the Danish Immigration Service for processing.

IMPORTANT: Biometic residence cards required for all non-EU students
As of 20 May 2012, all non-EU citizens aged over 18 must have their photograph, fingerprints and signature recorded digitally when they submit their application for a Danish residence permit. See where to apply for a biometric residence permit after May 20, 2012 (list is subject to change).

Note: As of 1 January 2011, a processing fee will normally be charged when applying for a residence permit or an extension of a residence permit. For further information about fees, please visit www.nyidanmark.dk

The International Office can help you
If you need help when applying for a Danish residence permit, contact the International Office at the institution you have been accepted to. They can guide you, if for example it is not possible to apply for a biometric residence permit in your home country. Contact details for all institutions.

Useful links

How to apply for a residence permit to study in Denmark
http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/studies/how_to_apply.htm

How do I register my residence in Denmark ?

Here we have listed some recommended steps for students seeking to register their residence in Denmark for one semester or longer

2 steps to registering in Denmark – from a Nordic country

3 steps to registering in Denmark – from an EU/EEA country

3 steps to registering in Denmark – from a country outside the EU/EEA

1. As a Nordic citizen you have the right to live, study and work in Denmark. Just remember to bring along identity papers with a photo, for example a driver’s license or passport. When you have arrived in Denmark, we recommend you register in the Civil Registration System (CPR) as soon as possible.  Go to the nearest Citizen Service Centre to apply (website in Danish only).

1. As a citizen of an EU/EEA country or of Switzerland, you have the right to live, study and work in Denmark. When you have arrived in Denmark, we recommend you apply for a registration certificate as soon as possible. A registration certificate is your documentation that you have the right to reside in Denmark. Go to the nearest regional State Administration to apply.

1. As a citizen of a country outside of the Nordic region, the EU/EEA or Switzerland, you must have a residence permit from the Danish Immigration Service before coming to Denmark. You can submit your application for residence permit through a Danish representative office (embassy or general consulate) in your home country as soon as you have received your admission letter from your Danish educational institution.

2. When you have received your CPR number, you are fully registered and can use the CPR number card to e.g. open a bank account, use the library or get a membership card for your local

 

2. When you have received your registration certificate, you should register in the Civil Registration System (CPR) as soon as possible.  Go to the nearest Citizen Service Centre to apply (website in Danish only).

2. After arrival in Denmark you should register in the Civil Registration System (CPR) as soon as possible.  Go to the nearest Citizen Service Centre to apply and remember to bring your residence permit (website in Danish only).

 

3.  When you have received your CPR number, you are fully registered and can use the CPR number card to e.g. open a bank account, use the library or get a membership card for your local DVD store.

 

3. When you have received your CPR number, you are fully registered and can use the CPR number card to e.g. open a bank account, use the library or get a membership card for your local DVD store.

 

 

Useful links

Citizen Service Centre
https://lifeindenmark.borger.dk/Pages/default.aspx

Regional state administration
http://statsforvaltning.dk/site.aspx?p=5466

Civil Registration System
https://cpr.dk/in-english/

How do I get a Danish ID-number? (CPR)

To obtain your personal ID-number while studying in Denmark you will need to register with the Danish Civil Registration System. Here is how to register

STDK. Students giving hands

To obtain your personal ID-number as an international student in Denmark you will need to register with the Danish Civil Registration System to obtain your personal ID number ('CPR number') while studying in Denmark.

Once registered you will be allocated a Civil Personal Registration (CPR) number. The CPR number is unique to the person and is used in Denmark as an ID number.

Almost all public authorities use the CPR registry system to e.g. avoid duplicate registration and errors with regards to a person's identity. The private sector will often ask for your CPR number, for instance when you want to open a bank account.

What is the Danish Civil Registration System?
The Danish Registration System contains the name, address, marital status, place of birth and other basic personal information of all residents in Denmark. The registry can be accessed by public authorities and can also be accessed by private individuals with a justified interest.

How to obtain a CPR number

To obtain a civil registry number (CPR number) on the basis of residence you must meet all the following criteria:

  1. Your stay in Denmark must last more than three months
    (Persons emigrating from other Nordic countries, irrespective of their nationality, nationals of an EU/EEA country or Switzerland (and their family members from third-countries) may stay in Denmark for up to six months before having to notify immigration authorities of their arrival)
  2. You have acquired a residence or a fixed place of abode in Denmark
  3. You are legally entitled to stay in the country (in terms of documentation, this means a residence permit)

Notification of arrival must be made to the local municipality within five days after the conditions mentioned in sections 2 and 3 are fulfilled.

Requisite documentation, including ID and documentation regarding the entitlement to stay in Denmark, must be presented for the purpose of registering your personal data in the CPR system. The local municipality can require any person to report in person prior to registration.

If you study in Denmark but do not officially reside there you can nonetheless still be allocated a CPR number for taxation purposes.

If you move or relocate after you have been registered in the system you are obliged to report this to your (new) municipality. Similarly, if you leave Denmark you are required to report your change of abode to the municipality where you are registered before you leave.

Useful links

The Civil Registration System
https://cpr.dk/in-english/

Regional State Administration
http://statsforvaltning.dk/site.aspx?p=5466

Information for Nordic citizens

As a Nordic citizen you are free to reside, study and work in Denmark without a permit

STDK. Students in lab

As a citizen of Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden you are free to reside, study and work in Denmark. You do not need a visa, residence permit or work permit.

As a Nordic citizen you can also enter Denmark without a passport. However, you must be able to identify yourself if required, for instance if you are staying in a hotel. Your driver's licence or credit card will do.

To find out more, visit Hallo Norden – the Nordic Council of Ministers' official information website, which  is particularly relevant to students, jobseekers or people who wish to move from one Nordic country to another.

Useful links
Hallo Norden
http://www.norden.org/da/norden-for-dig

Regional state administration
http://www.statsforvaltning.dk/site.aspx?p=6394

Accommodation

Denmark does not have a tradition for on-campus housing. Most students live together in residences situated some distance from campus. But as most students have a bike, this is not considered a problem. An efficient public transport system also makes it easy to travel between your residence, campus and the city center

Start looking months before you arrive

STDK.Tietgen

You should start to look for accommodation months before you arrive, as it can be very difficult to find accommodation right before the semester begins. Therefore, we strongly advise you to contact your Danish host institution for information about housing as soon as you have been accepted into a study programme.

Please be aware that it can be especially difficult to find accommodation in the bigger cities during August and September. We advise against travelling to Denmark at this time without reserving a room first.

Types of accommodation

Some international students prefer to rent a room or a sub-let from a Danish student or landlord. Student halls of residence is also an option. Others rent an apartment or a house, which they share with friends. Whether you choose to live in a student residence, apartment or house you will have to cater for yourself. Cleaning and doing your laundry are also your own responsibility. Look for the mentioned types of accommodation.

Student halls of residence (‘kollegier’)

Student residences offer accommodation in a communal environment. This kind of living may be particularly suitable for international students who have just arrived and don’t know anyone yet. Besides, the rent for a room is generally cheaper than that of a private room. Find a students halls of residence in Denmark.

FAQ

Can I bring my dog? It is not easy to find housing that allows you to bring any kind of pet. Most student residences and apartments have regulations concerning domestic animals. However, you can explore the possibilities by asking your host institution for advice.

Can I bring my family? As a student it is possible to apply for a bigger student residence if you have a family. Alternatively, you could look for private housing that suits your needs. You should expect it to take a little longer to find, however, than just a single room.

I have allergies. Can I get a room without carpets? It is certainly possible to find housing that accommodates this type of special needs. You need to mention this when applying or ask your host institution for advice.


Alex from England is living in a students residence hall while studying in Denmark

Find Housing

First, visit the website of your host institution and follow any recommendations you find here in terms of student housing. Also, listed below are useful websites to look for rooms and apartments for rent in Denmark

Consult your host institution

As a first step, we advice you to visit the website of your Danish host institution and follow any recommendations that you find there.

Student housing links

There are also local websites, which cover student housing within a specific city:

Rent from outgoing students (short-term rent)
If you are looking for housing for a shorter period (e.g. as an exchange student) one option could be to contact Danish students who will be studying abroad in the same time period that you will be studying in Denmark. You can use a service such as Housinganywhere connecting ingoing with outgoing exchange students. You could also try asking the individual student houses (listed above) if they could facilitate a shorter sublet.

Other housing links

On the following websites, individuals and agencies offer rooms and apartments for rent and sale. You can also place your own ad in English. Some of the websites will charge you a fee to access contact details.

Free websites

  • www.findbolig.nu (most comprehensive, only in Danish) 
    Student housing, flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent. With links to landlords/Real Estate Agents.
  • www.boligsurf.dk (in English)
    Flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent.
  • boligdeal.dk (partially English)
    Site coordinating communication between tenants, buyers and landlords of private housing
  • www.gromia.com (partially English)
    Site coordinating communication between tenants and landlords of private housing
  • boligoensker.dk (only in Danish)
    All around housing and accomodation
  • www.findroommate.dk
    Students and others looking for roommates
  • www.lejerbo.dk
    Lejerbo adminsters apartments across Denmark, including youth housing.
  • www.boliga.dk (Google translation)
    Student housing, flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent
  • www.ledige-lejligheder.dk (Google translation)
    Site coordinating communication between tenants, buyers and landlords of private housing
  • www.akutbolig.dk (Google translation)
    Site coordination communication between tenants and landlords of private housing

Pay-to-view

  • www.dba.dk (Google translation)
    Ebay affiliate. List of flats and rooms for rent. Some ads are free to view
  • www.boligportal.dk (in English)
    Flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent: 50 euro/2 months
  • www.bolighit.dk (in English)
    Flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent: 27 euro/3 months
  • www.lejebolig.dk (in English)
    Flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent: 50 euro/2 months
  • www.boligbasen.dk (in English)
    Flats, shared apartments and rooms for rent: 80 euro/6 months

How much does it cost?

Here are some examples. Please note that these are estimates.

Room in a students hall of residence (kollegium)

  • EURO 240-460 /month
  • USD 350-610 /month

Privately rented room in a house/flat (with access to shower)

Estimated price, 12-20m2 room

  • EURO 270-600 /month
  • USD 350-780 /month

Privately rented flat

Estimated price, 35-60m2 apartment

  • EURO 470-940 /month
  • USD 600-1200 /month

Housing benefit (‘boligsikring’)

EU/EEA citizens are eligible for housing benefits (‘boligsikring’) – a subsidy for rent from the local council. However, other subsidies for housing loans and deposits are not available. For details on the requirements and how to apply, please contact your local council.

Please note: Non-EU/EEA students in Denmark cannot apply for or receive housing benefits. If you do apply, it may result in your residence permit being revoked.

Avoid housing-scams

While crime-rates in Denmark are low, scams do occur. Here is how to avoid them when looking for housing:

  1. Be on the alert if a person with a room or flat for rent sendt you a text message with no visible phone number. These types of messages are sent though the web and may imply a scam.
  2. Never pay money under the table. It is illegal and you have no legal way of getting your money back
  3. Never pay the deposit in cash. Instead make a bank transfer so the transaction can be traced
  4. Never pay the rent or deposit via services where you cannot reverse the transaction, such as Moneybookers Escrow or Western Union.
  5. If you wish to see who owns the property you can do so at www.boligejer.dk
  6. Make sure that you receive a contract signed by the current tenant or landlord
  7. Always read the contract carefully and make sure that what you agreed on is also confirmed in writing
  8. When subleasing make sure that the landlord/owner of the property is informed of the sublease. This will put you in a better position in case of a conflict between the landlord/owner and the person subleasing to you.
  9. Be on the alert if you are required to sign immediately. Do not feel pressured into signing anything.

Housing tips from student to student

Finding a place to live can be difficult. Lisa has some great tips.

"In retrospective, I thought about a few things that might be helpful to others":

  • Double-check §7 and don't agree to give back the apartment refurbished,when it was not brand new when moving in; This is very important, because otherwise you have to renovate everything, from ceiling to the floor and this is very expensive!
  • Always make a protocol when moving in (ideally with pictures and detailed analysis of what is already damaged) and also when moving out (everything was fine, no harm done), because otherwise you might never see your deposit again!
  • If you are subrenting, make sure the person you are renting from is allowed to subrent, otherwise both of you can get kicked out!
  • Ask if CPR registration is possible, you need CPR for everything so it is bad to not have it
  • Ask for the name of the bank account you are sending your money to! First, you need that for online-transfer, second, you might want to know who has got your money in case of conflict.

"In my experience, and I hear that a lot, the most efficient way to find a room quickly if you are still abroad and cannot go any place to have a look by yourself – is to join every single housing group on Facebook you can find and keep your eyes open! There are lots of offerings from mostly international people who are used to do all the things over Skype and don’t have a problem with that. People can have a look at your profile, maybe you even have mutual friends, which is always helpful. Often there are groups for specific regions like "Germans in Copenhagen" or  "Italians in Copenhagen" where you can connect better because they speak the same language and there is more trust. There is also a lot of scam, be careful."

  • Another website for student housing is http://www.kab-bolig.dk/, however you need to pay 400dkk once in order to put yourself on the waiting list

"In my experience, Findroommate sadly is not working for international students. It is good in finding other internationals who are also looking, you can group with to organise a joined apartment. But it does not work for finding a room because there are mostly Danes looking for other Danes. I wrote about 50 very polite messages and received 2 replies, both telling me (in danish!) that they already have someone. So don’t spend your money and time on that if you are not Danish or cannot communicate in it."

  • When contacting people, try to offer some information about yourself. If you stick with "Hi I am looking for a room, xxx Lisa" you probably wont receive many replies. People don’t have time, they need to know if you are a future roommate-candidate or not, so give them some detail:
    -> Age and origin 
    -> Future occupation (studying? working?) 
    -> If you have experience in sharing apartments, tell them that! 
    -> Morning or evening-person (this is helpful for both of you!)
    -> Smoker or non-smoker 
    -> Any weird hobbies? Or just normal yoga-cooking-tv-series-stuff?
    -> Will your boy/girlfriend be there a lot? Then you should mention that at some point. 
    -> give them a link to your Xing or Linked or website if you have one; also provide a Skype name or
    other means of communication; offer them to add you on Facebook (you can put them on restricted anyway but it’s good for the feeling).
  • Don’t tell them very private stuff, of course. Stay high-level but let them know who you are at least a little bit.

Learn Danish for free

Most Danes speak English quite well. Nevertheless, being able to speak some Danish will benefit you both socially and if you want to look for a job

Learn Danish for free

As an international student or employee in Denmark you can take Danish language lessons free of charge. To sign up you need a Danish CPR number (i.e. ID number).

The language courses are offered by a network of private and public language centres. You can choose between day or evening courses, which are concluded with a state-approved test in line with the Common European Framework for Languages.

Online Danish courses
If you have a Danish CPR number, free Danish courses are often available as an online activity at language school. Courses are targeted at both beginners and those who already have some knowledge of the Danish language. Students can use them to reach a good level of Danish proficiency or as a supplement to ongoing language education. Examples of these on-line courses are Danish Online studies at IA Sprog and  Learn Danish online with the Copenhagen Language Center - both of whom offer courses as online long distance learning.

Free Danish courses at higher education institutions
Many Danish higher education institutions offer intensive Danish language courses at the beginning of the academic year or as a part of a summer university programme. To learn more, contact the International Office at your Danish host institution.

Learn Danish in your home country
Danish courses are taught at several universities around the world. The Danish Cultural Institute also offers Danish language courses to foreign university students through their branches abroad. The Danish Embassy or Consulate in your home country can also help you locate opportunities to learn Danish near where you live. And some Danish Language Schools also offer Danish as an online course (e.g. Netdansk)


This video explains what it is like to learn Danish at a Danish Language Center

How difficult is it to learn Danish?

Find out of what people from different countries think about learning Danish

Useful links

Working in Denmark

Many students in Denmark hold a part-time job. As an international student in Denmark you too will have the right to work while you live here. You will also have the opportunity to seek full-time employment when you have completed your studies

Working hours & legalities

If you are a Nordic, EU/EEA or Swiss citizen, there are no restrictions to the number of hours you can work in Denmark. As a non-EU/EAA student you can work for up to 20 hours a week while you study in Denmark

STDK.KARCH. Arkitekt ser på tegning

Nordic, EU/EEA or Swiss citizens can work in Denmark under the EU rules regarding the free movement of people and services, with no restriction on the number of hours.

Non-EU/EEA/Swiss citizens may work in Denmark for up to 20 hours a week and full-time during June, July and August. However, this requires a work permit sticker in your passport. If you did not apply for a work permit when applying for a residence permit to study in Denmark, you can apply for one at the Danish Immigration Service. How to apply for a student residence permit.

If you are under 18 years of age, you are only eligible for a work permit if you have a written offer or contract for a specific position. The employer must also confirm to the Danish Immigration Service that he or she upholds workplace environment legislation.

Please note: If you work illegally in Denmark – for example by working more than 20 hours a week as a non-EU/EEA student – the Danish Immigration Service will either revoke your residence permit or refuse to extend it. You risk deportation. Also, both you and your employer could face a prison sentence or be fined.

Useful links
How to apply for at residence permit to study in Denmark
http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/studies/how_to_apply.htm

Where to look for jobs in Denmark
http://studyindenmark.dk/live-in-denmark/working-in-denmark/after-graduation/

Taxes

Denmark is an advanced welfare state. This means that a number of important services are covered through taxes, such as healthcare. Here is what you need to know about paying tax in Denmark

With an extensive public service, income tax rates in Denmark are among the highest in the world. However, the tax system is progressive – the more you earn, the higher taxes you pay.

Do I need to pay taxes in Denmark?

STDK. Snow in Copenhagen2

All residents and everyone earning a salary in Denmark are liable for Danish taxation. As a rule you must pay tax on all your earnings in Denmark – and on those you earn abroad. The amount of tax will depend on your annual income and tax liability.

What is a tax card?

If you have a salary income in Denmark you must apply for a tax card from your local tax office. A tax card is an official document that indicates how much tax you have to pay.

How do I get a tax card?

Once you have received your Civil Personal Registration number (CPR number) you must contact SKAT (Danish Tax and Customs Administration) and inform them how much you expect to earn in the calendar year.

In order to obtain your tax card you must complete a special form called “04.063”.
You can fill out the electronic form here:

The completed form must be submitted electronically to the tax office. The Danish Tax and Customs Administration will then issue a tax card.

Your employer will obtain your tax card digitally from SKAT. Your income tax is then automatically deducted at source from your wages by your employer before you receive your pay.

Contact SKAT at tel.: +45 72 22 18 18 or find the address of your nearest tax office at www.skat.dk

When you leave Denmark

If you leave Denmark your taxability has to be determined. Therefore, you must remember to inform SKAT before you move abroad (incl. to Greenland/ Faroe Islands). When you leave you must complete a special form, 04.029E, and send it to your local tax office. You can download the form here: www.skat.dk.

Useful links
04.063 (Danish/English version)
http://www.skat.dk/getFile.aspx?Id=77649

The Danish Tax and Customs Administration
http://www.skat.dk/SKAT.aspx?oId=2166790&lang=us

04.029E
http://www.skat.dk/getFile.aspx?Id=41956&newwindow=true

Student jobs

Finding a student job in Denmark is not always easy if you don’t speak Danish. However, bars, restaurants and workplaces that require special foreign language skills are good places to look for one

STDK. Bar Kassen

Some international students find employment in bars or restaurants. Others distribute newspapers, work in telemarketing or get jobs where specific foreign language skills are required. Some students are lucky enough to find employment relevant to their studies.

You should not, however, count on obtaining a part-time job nor plan your finances accordingly. It is not always easy to find a student job in Denmark if you don’t speak Danish. As an international student in Denmark you can take Danish lessons for free, which will improve your chances of finding employment in Denmark.

Where to search for student jobs

Some academic institutions have online job banks or career centres that can assist you in finding a student job. Please enquire at your host institution. In addition, the official Danish website for international recruitment www.workindenmark.dk offers information on how to find a relevant student job, how to write an application, what to do in a job interview, etc. The site also has a job and CV bank.

Jobportals

Danish government website for international recruitment

Other jobportals in English

About working in Denmark

Work after graduation

Here is what you need to know if you would like to work in Denmark after you graduate

Denmark offers a wide variety of possibilities for working after graduation. Whether you are strictly focused on advancing your career or want to find the right balance between work and life the Danish jobmarket will have opportunities for you. Which field do you want to pursue a career in?


Which career would you like to pursue after studying? We asked 19 international students. Find out more in our video section.

Here’s how different nationalities can go about their Danish post-graduation job-hunt:

  • Nordic citizens of Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden are free to enter, reside, study and work in Denmark. Neither visas nor residence or work permits are required.
  • EU/EEA/Swiss citizens do not need to apply for a work permit. You may stay in Denmark under the EU rules regarding the free movement of people and services. But if you want to stay for longer than three months, you must apply for a registration certificate under EU rules. The application must be submitted within three months of entering Denmark. Please note: the special interim arrangement concerning employees from Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia ended on 1 May 2009.
  • Non-EU/EEA/Swiss citizens will need a residence permit to work in Denmark. Upon graduation from a Danish higher education institution, your residence permit will remain valid for an additional six months, allowing you to seek employment in Denmark. Provided your visa hasn’t already been extended for an extra six months you can apply for such an extension to your permit. For further information on how to extend your residence permit, please visit: http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/studies/extension.htm

As a service for jobseekers, some educational institutions offer alumni networks to their graduates. These represent a valuable source of information regarding

Starting up your own business in Denmark

As an international graduate from a Danish higher education institution you may of course also want to explore the opportunity of starting up your own business. For this purpose you can have a look at this step-by-step guide on how to start up a business in Denmark.

Danish jobportals in English language

Other useful links

STDK. Student rasing his arms in lecture hall

Travel & Transport

As an international student in Denmark, you will find it easy to get around. Public transport is highly efficient and Denmark's location makes it a gateway between Scandinavia and the rest of Europe

Gateway to Europe

Denmark's location makes it an excellent gateway to the rest of Scandinavia and Europe. Berlin is just an hour’s flight away. London and Paris can be reached in less than two hours, and Barcelona, Rome, Vienna and Prague are all just a few hours away. Denmark also has excellent transport infrastructure, which makes it easy for you to explore the nation’s scenic countryside and national parks in your free time and holidays.

Gateway to Europe1

Travel in Denmark

Denmark consists of the peninsula of Jutland and an archipelago of 433 named islands. All 72 inhabited Danish islands are connected by ferryboat service or bridge. The two largest and most densely populated islands are Zealand and Funen.

Denmark has two mega-bridges – one connecting Funen and Sealand (the Great Belt Bridge) and one connecting Copenhagen and the Swedish city of Malmö (the Öresund Bridge). Both are among Europe’s biggest. Bridges also connect other Danish islands, including the bridge between Jutland and Funen (the Little Belt Bridge).

The Danish motorway network now covers 1,111 km and the railway network totals 2,667 km of track. You can travel to most cities by train, bus, or ferry. Copenhagen has one of the world’s most efficient metro systems – a fully-automated system operating 24/7. Denmark has several international airports, the largest of which are Copenhagen and Billund. There are also domestic flights between Copenhagen and the cities of Aalborg, Aarhus and Rønne.

STDK. CPH Airport2

STDK. Metro

STDK: DSB Train

Public transport in Denmark uses a common pricing and zoning system. Access further information by clicking on the links below:

Arriving from abroad

Arriving in eastern Denmark
You will most likely fly to Copenhagen Airport, the largest airport in Scandinavia. Handling around 9,691,000 passengers each year, it is located 8 km southeast of the city centre. From the airport, the city centre can be accessed in various ways:

  • Train: There is a train station under terminal three, which is served by airport shuttle trains and intercity trains. Travel time to the city centre: approx. 12 min. There are also trains to Malmö in Sweden and high-speed trains to the Swedish capital, Stockholm.
  • Metro: Line M2 links the airport with the city centre. Travel time to the city centre: approx. 15 min.
  • Bus: Movia buses 5A, 35, 36, 75 E, 76 E and 96 N and Gråhundbus line 999 all stop at the airport. Bus 888, the express to Jutland, also stops at the airport. Movia bus 2A stops near the airport. There are long-distance buses to Sweden.
  • Car: The airport has 8,600 parking spaces. The E20 motorway goes right by the airport. Junctions 15, 16, and 17 are the best exits.
  • Taxi: A taxi fare to the city centre costs around DKK 200,00 (€27). The ride takes around 15-20 minutes, depending on traffic conditions. So taking the metro is faster – and cheaper.

See public transportation route planner

Arriving in western Denmark

For the west of the country, the major airport is Billund, which is located just 2 km outside of the city of Billund in Central Jutland. From the airport, the city centre and other major cities in Jutland can be accessed in various ways:

  • Bus: There is an airport shuttle bus service.

STDK. Mom on Christinia bike

Alternatively, Aarhus Airport is located in northeast Jutland around 36 km from the city of Aarhus. From the airport, the city centre can be accessed in various ways:

  • By taxi: There are taxis available outside the terminal building. The fare is around 300 DKK (€41) and takes approximately 30 minutes.
  • By bus: There is an airport shuttle bus service. Also, route 212 between Ebeltoft and Randers stops at the airport.

Ferries provide services from Denmark to Germany, Sweden, Norway and the UK.

Getting around on your bike ...

Almost all Danes own a bicycle. In small towns and cities alike, cycling is the most common means of transport. Easy, cheap and eco-friendly, cycling makes an excellent alternative to driving. The facts are impressive. In Copenhagen alone:

  • Cyclists pedal a total of 1.1 million kilometres – every day! That is the equivalent of a couple of brisk trips to the Moon and back
  • There are 350 km of cycle lanes and 40 km of parkland cycle routes. This equals the entire length of Denmark.
  • The city’s bicycle infrastructure is state of the art – with green waves and special traffic regulation for bicycles.
  • One out of three people travel to work or school by pedal-power every day

Bringing your car

If you are coming to Denmark in a vehicle with a foreign registration, you have to get it registered in Denmark within two weeks of arrivel. There are two options of registering, depending on the length of your stay:

If you stay in Denmark more than 185 days:

You MUST register your vehicle in Denmark (changing your domestic registration plates to Danish registration plates) from day one and pay registration tax (proportional (quarterly) tax to be paid). Use application form: 21.033 EN.

If you stay in Denmark in 185 days or less:

You CAN apply for permission to drive your vehicle in Denmark keeping your domestic registration plates without paying Danish registration tax. Use application form: 21.059 EN. The price for applying for this permit is of 400 DKK! You MUST on demand show documentation issued by your institution that you are enrolled as a student (including time of stay: starting date and completion date). This documentation must be shown on demand to tax officers or police.

    Make sure that your insurance is valid in Denmark including Danish liability insurance requirements.

     

    Useful links

    See also:
    www.denmark.dk - the official website of Denmark
    www.visitdenmark.com - tourist information for visitors to Denmark
    www.visitcopenhagen.com - information about the Danish capital
    www.visitaarhus.com - information about Denmark's second largest city
    www.visitodense.com - information about Denmark's third largest city
    www.visitaalborg.com - information about Denmark's fourth largest city

    Teaching Style in Denmark

    Danish higher education features innovative teaching methods and an informal learning environment designed to promote creativity, self-expression, analytical and critical thinking

    Teaching style - characteristics:

    • Student-centered learning and and open debate during class
    • Close collaboration between students and teachers
    • Traditonal lectures combined with project work with the teacher as a consultant
    • Active participation and problem solving rather than passive listening
    • Focus on turning new knowledge and learning into innovative solutions

    You gain:

    • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
    • The ability to work analytically and creatively in a problem-solving environment
    • The ability to work independently as well as effectively as a team member
    • An internationally recognised qualification
    • An international profile - and an excellent foundation for your future career


    VIDEO: What it's like to study abroad in Denmark? We asked 19 international students.
    Watch more student testimonials

    THINK-PLAY-PARTICIPATE

    Students in Denmark are expected to play an active role in their own learning process. Apart from attending traditional lectures, students engage in  project work and are encouraged to participate in open discussions with their teachers and fellow students.

    Project work & problem based learning

    As a student in Denmark you will attend lectures, study independently and undertake projects – on your own and in groups of students. These projects will challenge you to think  freely, to use your initiative and be creative. They will also give you experience in using new knowledge to solve complex real-world problems.

    students around table

    In addition to project work, Danish professors often have experience as working professionals, offering students an invaluable practical perspective. Moreover, many Danish educational institutions are partnered with local companies and public organisations for research purposes, and many programmes offer students internships and thus work experience.

    What a typical week look like

    A typical week of classes will consist of 10 hours of tuition and around 30 hours of preparation, self-study and project work. This, however, varies depending on the type of higher education institution.

    The on-going evaluation of your progress will take place through oral and written exams.